Research Tips for Advanced

Once past the initial genealogy exercises of elementary school, there are two more times in a person’s life when an interest in family and family ancestors seems to ‘come to the surface.’ After the early school years, the next period in most people’s lives when a natural interest in genealogy reappears is at the birth of your own children. The usual questions are: who does this new ‘little one' resemble in the family? Will they have Aunt Jane’s hair, or Uncle John’s baldness? Will they be a rocket scientist like Aunt Mary, or work in nursing like Uncle Harry?

The third time in most people’s lives when a natural interest in genealogy reappears is at the birth of your own grandchildren. This is the time when many people want to search not only for near ancestors, but also to start digging for more information on family further afield: Mom always said that her father came to the United States through Ellis Island in New York. Did he really? Can I corroborate that? Did he really come from the area of Alsace-Lorraine in west Germany, like Mom once told me? Or did he actually come from Ostfriesland in northwest Germany? Where did grandpa’s parents come from? And so on.

We enjoy genealogy. It is a fascinating way to ‘re-see’ the history of our part of the world. And we are lucky to live at time when all kinds of records are being digitized and posted to the web for public viewing. Genealogy has never been as easy to do as it is today. Good luck with your searching. We’re here to offer assistance, if you’d like that.


General Tips for Intermediate to Advanced Genealogists

Higdon Tips for Intermediate to Advanced Genealogists

Numbering Systems for Genealogical Research

Consanguinity Charts - What’s a Cousin? 



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